Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Data’

Wonder what you would find if you frisked the 2010 United States Census data that was released yesterday?

Answer: Good news for red states and bad news for blue states.

The Washington Times reports:

The conservative “red” states should see their political clout enhanced as a result of the Census Bureau’s announcement Tuesday that the nation’s population grew 9.7 percent over the past decade to nearly 309 million, with the fastest growth centered in states that went Republican in the 2008 presidential election.

[...]

As a result of the 2010 numbers, eight states will gain House seats in the 2012 elections, led by Texas’ four seats and Florida, which gained two. Others gaining a single House seat were Arizona, Georgia, Nevada, South Carolina, Utah and Washington.

New York and Ohio were the big losers, both shedding two House seats, while Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey and Pennsylvania will lose one seat.

Although the growing Hispanic-immigrant population is mainly responsible for Texas and Florida’s huge House seat pickups, the overall Census data still means a lot politically:

Most states gaining seats went for Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) in the 2008 presidential election, while almost all states that lost seats were won by President Obama — many of them in the Rust Belt.

The westward movement of the U.S. population means six districts in states that went for Obama will shift to states that went for McCain — a small but significant shift that could help a GOP presidential candidate in 2012, provided they can hold those states for the party.

Most of the other new seats will be in swing states that went for Obama, which could also be won by Republicans in 2012.

It also doesn’t hurt the Republican Party, because our 2010 gains put us in control of the redistricting process and will help us with drawing new district lines. Although this is all good news, it still does not make the 2012 general election any easier. Not only do we have to worry about effectively relaying our message to the growing Hispanic-immigrant demographic, we have to stay extremely focused on the issues that favor Republicans. Since President Obama does not have a popular or effective record to run on, the Democrats will more than likely toss around the race-card like it’s going out of style.

Here’s another interesting observation in regards to the new 2010 Census data:

First, the great engine of growth in America is not the Northeast Megalopolis, which was growing faster than average in the mid-20th century, or California, which grew lustily in the succeeding half-century. It is Texas.

This leads to a second point, which is that growth tends to be stronger where taxes are lower. Seven of the nine states that do not levy an income tax grew faster than the national average. The other two, South Dakota and New Hampshire, had the fastest growth in their regions, the Midwest and New England.

Altogether, 35 percent of the nation’s total population growth occurred in these nine non-taxing states, which accounted for just 19 percent of total population at the beginning of the decade.

Perhaps the Democrats will look to this as a lesson in understanding how high taxation affects states, citizens, and economies… Needless to say, I am not holding my breath.

Click to become of a fan of Frisk A Liberal on Facebook!

Read Full Post »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 26 other followers